What Are the Rights of Victims Infected With STDs?

August 3rd, 2021 by dayat Leave a reply »

Recent data released by the Center for Disease Control (CDC) shows that there has been a significant rise in sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) over the last decade. The largest rise in infections is among those who are 65 and older, a group of people that were thought to be the safest.

However, there has been a steady rise in every STD except AIDS/HIV throughout the country for 10 years. Contributing factors to this increase is the failure of the infected person to tell their partner that they have a disease, use of protection during sexual encounters, or failure to seek medical treatment once infected.

STD treatments are very costly and can require a lifetime of treatment. Some STD’s may even cause other medical conditions to appear or to worsen. This is why it is imperative that you seek compensation so that you can receive the medical care necessary to treat these diseases quickly and completely.

To prove your case, the law requires that the victim prove:

1. That the person who infected them knew or should have known they were infected with the STD.

2. The carrier of the disease did not disclose to the victim that they had a STD.

3. The person acquired this disease as the result of this nondisclosure.

If these three facts can be proven, the victim has the right to receive compensation under personal injury law.

Infection Prevention

The best thing that anyone can do for their health is to have themselves screened for STD’s before they become sexually active with a new partner. It is not unreasonable to request this from your potential partner either. While it may make you feel a little uncomfortable to approach this subject, it is in the best interest of your health and theirs.

Sexually transmitted diseases, in most cases, can be treated with an antibiotic regimen if caught early enough. Sadly, some of these diseases are lifetime disorders, but they too can be managed with medication and treatment. Knowing if you are infected is crucial to recovery.

It is always important to use protection when you are sexually active. Even though this has been made clear through many public service announcements, schooling, and doctor visits, many people still opt to enjoy sex unprotected, risking their lives and that of their future partners.

It is not against the law to have unprotected sex with someone without disclosing a STD infection unless it is AIDS/HIV, it is a criminal act to have unprotected sex without informing the partner of the potential to contract HIV/AIDS. Other STD’s currently do not fall under this law. However, infecting someone can lead to a personal injury lawsuit being taken out against you.

In the end, the best thing that you can do is know your partner, use protection, and seek medical care in the event that you suspect you may have been infected with a STD. If you have been transmitted a sexual disease, seek legal representation so that you may cover all your expenses for treatment.

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